Designing Reality

AR2

DESIGNING REALITY

by Evan-Zane Green

Augmented Reality (AR) is an “enhanced version of the physical world” (Hayes). It involves adding design elements to the real world. Probably the most familiar example of augmented reality is Pokémon Go. While the game’s popularity may have dropped somewhat, AR is continuing to grow in popularity and, along with its counterparts Virtual Reality (VR) and Mixed Reality (MR), it is changing the way humans and technology interact. Naturally, that means it changes how designers think about design.

How to Think About AR

Augmented reality is still relatively new and can seem like an insurmountable challenge. It may seem impossible to have to design for, not just a canvas or an artboard, but for the world itself. However, it is important that designers see this as a golden opportunity to create an experience for users. As designers, we are used to thinking about our projects in the limitations of two-dimensional space. “AR completely flips that distinction, and asks you to think about design from a 3D perspective” (Broadhurst). It is important to remember that you “aren’t un-learning the skills that have taken you this far” (Broadhurst). There is no need to throw away your old degree or past experiences. Just repurpose what you already know in order for it to exist side by side with real world elements.

AR1

Image by Good Studio

What Skills Do You Need?

The technical skills required for designing augmented reality aren’t very different from the tools and skills used in 2D design. Typically designers can go down a few different routes:

Adding Two-Dimensional Elements to the Real World

Using flat images or 2D animation to enhance the world is one method of stepping into augmented reality. One example of this is a cultural collaboration project between Gemäldegalerie (an art museum in Berlin, Germany) and Project museum4punkt0 (an initiative to merge modern technology with cultural institutions). This project created an app that shows the process of the artists in an x-ray view when the viewer points their iPad at the artwork.

Adding Three-Dimensional Elements to the Real World

3D design and animation opens a lot of possibilities for the world of augmented reality. By using tools such as Maya, Cinema 4D, and Blender, designers can add their creations on top of the real world. IKEA did that with the IKEA’s Place app which allows shoppers to add virtual furniture to the rooms in their house so that they can see what it will look like in the space (Unknown).

Adding Audio to the Real World

Visual stimulus is not all that you can add. For both creative and accessibility reasons, try using audio cues as well. NEEEU, in partnership with the Natural History Museum in Berlin, created an exhibit where viewers could listen to the calls of the featured birds if they scanned certain markers with their smartphones (Unknown).

Don’t forget, you’re not limited to only one of the above routes (or only these routes at all). “It’s about bringing together different skill sets and seeing how we can build a product or app that’s going to benefit the environment” (Ivil).

Potential Design Impacts

So augmented reality will have a big impact on the design world but how specifically?

Apps will be more interactive. Shopping apps are a good example of this. You will be able to see “how a piece of furniture works in [your] home or how a dress fits on [your] frame” (Papaefstathiou). You will be able to find information about products and places as you walk past them so you can make a split-second decision of whether you want to know more.

Make mobile experiences more entertaining. In 2020, over 2 billion people have a smartphone and “61% of people are using their phones to go online” (Papaefstathiou). People always have their cell phones and it is important that designers use this to their benefit. As designers, we can use AR to help people engage with brands in ways that are informative and entertaining.

We no longer measure our design space in pixels. We have the ability to move from designing a screen to designing a physical space with AR. It makes it possible to add illustrative elements to places like the rooms in your house. Imagine that you are in your living room one minute and the next you are watching your favourite television show in the Amazon jungle.

Designing for new interactions will be a must. Augmented reality will push creatives to design for a world that gets progressively “more fluid and three-dimensional” (Papaefstathiou).This means we will need to understand new technologies and rethink old ones. We will need to think more about how people can interact with products, for example, using eye-tracking technology to let users select objects based on where they are looking (Papaefstathiou).

How to Jump In

While augmented reality in design is still relatively new, there are a few options for cutting your teeth on it. Adobe Aero is Adobe’s app for the iPad that allows users to test their AR designs in the real world. Zappar Studio is a program that allows users to design for AR as well. Learning programming languages like JavaScript may be helpful, but as programs become more designer friendly it becomes less necessary. Finally, a lot of AR designs are built out in the Unreal gaming engine. It is free and a good way to add different media.

Sources

  • Hayes, Adam. Augmented Reality Definition. 2 Dec. 2020, www.investopedia.com/terms/a/augmented-reality.asp.
  • Papaefstathiou, Maria. “AR’s Impending Impact on the Graphic Design Industry.” Graphic Art News, 23 May 2019, www.graphicart-news.com/ars-impending-impact-on-the-graphic-design-industry/.
  • Unknown. “Will Augmented Reality Last in Design Once the Hype Passes?” AIGA Eye on Design, 4 Feb. 2019, eyeondesign.aiga.org/the-designers-shaping-ars-present-and-future/.

Credits

Images by Visual Generation and Good Studio.

AR2

DESIGNING REALITY

by Evan-Zane Green

Augmented Reality (AR) is an “enhanced version of the physical world” (Hayes). It involves adding design elements to the real world. Probably the most familiar example of augmented reality is Pokémon Go. While the game’s popularity may have dropped somewhat, AR is continuing to grow in popularity and, along with its counterparts Virtual Reality (VR) and Mixed Reality (MR), it is changing the way humans and technology interact. Naturally, that means it changes how designers think about design.

How to Think About AR

Augmented reality is still relatively new and can seem like an insurmountable challenge. It may seem impossible to have to design for, not just a canvas or an artboard, but for the world itself. However, it is important that designers see this as a golden opportunity to create an experience for users. As designers, we are used to thinking about our projects in the limitations of two-dimensional space. “AR completely flips that distinction, and asks you to think about design from a 3D perspective” (Broadhurst). It is important to remember that you “aren’t un-learning the skills that have taken you this far” (Broadhurst). There is no need to throw away your old degree or past experiences. Just repurpose what you already know in order for it to exist side by side with real world elements.

AR1

Image by Good Studio

What Skills Do You Need?

The technical skills required for designing augmented reality aren’t very different from the tools and skills used in 2D design. Typically designers can go down a few different routes:

Adding Two-Dimensional Elements to the Real World

Using flat images or 2D animation to enhance the world is one method of stepping into augmented reality. One example of this is a cultural collaboration project between Gemäldegalerie (an art museum in Berlin, Germany) and Project museum4punkt0 (an initiative to merge modern technology with cultural institutions). This project created an app that shows the process of the artists in an x-ray view when the viewer points their iPad at the artwork.

Adding Three-Dimensional Elements to the Real World

3D design and animation opens a lot of possibilities for the world of augmented reality. By using tools such as Maya, Cinema 4D, and Blender, designers can add their creations on top of the real world. IKEA did that with the IKEA’s Place app which allows shoppers to add virtual furniture to the rooms in their house so that they can see what it will look like in the space (Unknown).

Adding Audio to the Real World

Visual stimulus is not all that you can add. For both creative and accessibility reasons, try using audio cues as well. NEEEU, in partnership with the Natural History Museum in Berlin, created an exhibit where viewers could listen to the calls of the featured birds if they scanned certain markers with their smartphones (Unknown).

Don’t forget, you’re not limited to only one of the above routes (or only these routes at all). “It’s about bringing together different skill sets and seeing how we can build a product or app that’s going to benefit the environment” (Ivil).

Potential Design Impacts

So augmented reality will have a big impact on the design world but how specifically?

Apps will be more interactive. Shopping apps are a good example of this. You will be able to see “how a piece of furniture works in [your] home or how a dress fits on [your] frame” (Papaefstathiou). You will be able to find information about products and places as you walk past them so you can make a split-second decision of whether you want to know more.

Make mobile experiences more entertaining. In 2020, over 2 billion people have a smartphone and “61% of people are using their phones to go online” (Papaefstathiou). People always have their cell phones and it is important that designers use this to their benefit. As designers, we can use AR to help people engage with brands in ways that are informative and entertaining.

We no longer measure our design space in pixels. We have the ability to move from designing a screen to designing a physical space with AR. It makes it possible to add illustrative elements to places like the rooms in your house. Imagine that you are in your living room one minute and the next you are watching your favourite television show in the Amazon jungle.

Designing for new interactions will be a must. Augmented reality will push creatives to design for a world that gets progressively “more fluid and three-dimensional” (Papaefstathiou).This means we will need to understand new technologies and rethink old ones. We will need to think more about how people can interact with products, for example, using eye-tracking technology to let users select objects based on where they are looking (Papaefstathiou).

How to Jump In

While augmented reality in design is still relatively new, there are a few options for cutting your teeth on it. Adobe Aero is Adobe’s app for the iPad that allows users to test their AR designs in the real world. Zappar Studio is a program that allows users to design for AR as well. Learning programming languages like JavaScript may be helpful, but as programs become more designer friendly it becomes less necessary. Finally, a lot of AR designs are built out in the Unreal gaming engine. It is free and a good way to add different media.

Sources

  • Hayes, Adam. Augmented Reality Definition. 2 Dec. 2020, www.investopedia.com/terms/a/augmented-reality.asp.
  • Papaefstathiou, Maria. “AR’s Impending Impact on the Graphic Design Industry.” Graphic Art News, 23 May 2019, www.graphicart-news.com/ars-impending-impact-on-the-graphic-design-industry/.
  • Unknown. “Will Augmented Reality Last in Design Once the Hype Passes?” AIGA Eye on Design, 4 Feb. 2019, eyeondesign.aiga.org/the-designers-shaping-ars-present-and-future/.

Credits

Images by Visual Generation and Good Studio.

AR2

DESIGNING REALITY

by Evan-Zane Green

Augmented Reality (AR) is an “enhanced version of the physical world” (Hayes). It involves adding design elements to the real world. Probably the most familiar example of augmented reality is Pokémon Go. While the game’s popularity may have dropped somewhat, AR is continuing to grow in popularity and, along with its counterparts Virtual Reality (VR) and Mixed Reality (MR), it is changing the way humans and technology interact. Naturally, that means it changes how designers think about design.

How to Think About AR

Augmented reality is still relatively new and can seem like an insurmountable challenge. It may seem impossible to have to design for, not just a canvas or an artboard, but for the world itself. However, it is important that designers see this as a golden opportunity to create an experience for users. As designers, we are used to thinking about our projects in the limitations of two-dimensional space. “AR completely flips that distinction, and asks you to think about design from a 3D perspective” (Broadhurst). It is important to remember that you “aren’t un-learning the skills that have taken you this far” (Broadhurst). There is no need to throw away your old degree or past experiences. Just repurpose what you already know in order for it to exist side by side with real world elements.

AR1

Image by Good Studio

What Skills Do You Need?

The technical skills required for designing augmented reality aren’t very different from the tools and skills used in 2D design. Typically designers can go down a few different routes:

Adding Two-Dimensional Elements to the Real World

Using flat images or 2D animation to enhance the world is one method of stepping into augmented reality. One example of this is a cultural collaboration project between Gemäldegalerie (an art museum in Berlin, Germany) and Project museum4punkt0 (an initiative to merge modern technology with cultural institutions). This project created an app that shows the process of the artists in an x-ray view when the viewer points their iPad at the artwork.

Adding Three-Dimensional Elements to the Real World

3D design and animation opens a lot of possibilities for the world of augmented reality. By using tools such as Maya, Cinema 4D, and Blender, designers can add their creations on top of the real world. IKEA did that with the IKEA’s Place app which allows shoppers to add virtual furniture to the rooms in their house so that they can see what it will look like in the space (Unknown).

Adding Audio to the Real World

Visual stimulus is not all that you can add. For both creative and accessibility reasons, try using audio cues as well. NEEEU, in partnership with the Natural History Museum in Berlin, created an exhibit where viewers could listen to the calls of the featured birds if they scanned certain markers with their smartphones (Unknown).

Don’t forget, you’re not limited to only one of the above routes (or only these routes at all). “It’s about bringing together different skill sets and seeing how we can build a product or app that’s going to benefit the environment” (Ivil).

Potential Design Impacts

So augmented reality will have a big impact on the design world but how specifically?

Apps will be more interactive. Shopping apps are a good example of this. You will be able to see “how a piece of furniture works in [your] home or how a dress fits on [your] frame” (Papaefstathiou). You will be able to find information about products and places as you walk past them so you can make a split-second decision of whether you want to know more.

Make mobile experiences more entertaining. In 2020, over 2 billion people have a smartphone and “61% of people are using their phones to go online” (Papaefstathiou). People always have their cell phones and it is important that designers use this to their benefit. As designers, we can use AR to help people engage with brands in ways that are informative and entertaining.

We no longer measure our design space in pixels. We have the ability to move from designing a screen to designing a physical space with AR. It makes it possible to add illustrative elements to places like the rooms in your house. Imagine that you are in your living room one minute and the next you are watching your favourite television show in the Amazon jungle.

Designing for new interactions will be a must. Augmented reality will push creatives to design for a world that gets progressively “more fluid and three-dimensional” (Papaefstathiou).This means we will need to understand new technologies and rethink old ones. We will need to think more about how people can interact with products, for example, using eye-tracking technology to let users select objects based on where they are looking (Papaefstathiou).

How to Jump In

While augmented reality in design is still relatively new, there are a few options for cutting your teeth on it. Adobe Aero is Adobe’s app for the iPad that allows users to test their AR designs in the real world. Zappar Studio is a program that allows users to design for AR as well. Learning programming languages like JavaScript may be helpful, but as programs become more designer friendly it becomes less necessary. Finally, a lot of AR designs are built out in the Unreal gaming engine. It is free and a good way to add different media.

Sources

  • Hayes, Adam. Augmented Reality Definition. 2 Dec. 2020, www.investopedia.com/terms/a/augmented-reality.asp.
  • Papaefstathiou, Maria. “AR’s Impending Impact on the Graphic Design Industry.” Graphic Art News, 23 May 2019, www.graphicart-news.com/ars-impending-impact-on-the-graphic-design-industry/.
  • Unknown. “Will Augmented Reality Last in Design Once the Hype Passes?” AIGA Eye on Design, 4 Feb. 2019, eyeondesign.aiga.org/the-designers-shaping-ars-present-and-future/.

Credits

Images by Visual Generation and Good Studio.

DESIGNING REALITY

by Evan-Zane Green

Augmented Reality (AR) is an “enhanced version of the physical world” (Hayes). It involves adding design elements to the real world. Probably the most familiar example of augmented reality is Pokémon Go. While the game’s popularity may have dropped somewhat, AR is continuing to grow in popularity and, along with its counterparts Virtual Reality (VR) and Mixed Reality (MR), it is changing the way humans and technology interact. Naturally, that means it changes how designers think about design.

How to Think About AR

Augmented reality is still relatively new and can seem like an insurmountable challenge. It may seem impossible to have to design for, not just a canvas or an artboard, but for the world itself. However, it is important that designers see this as a golden opportunity to create an experience for users. As designers, we are used to thinking about our projects in the limitations of two-dimensional space. “AR completely flips that distinction, and asks you to think about design from a 3D perspective” (Broadhurst). It is important to remember that you “aren’t un-learning the skills that have taken you this far” (Broadhurst). There is no need to throw away your old degree or past experiences. Just repurpose what you already know in order for it to exist side by side with real world elements.

Image by Good Studio

What Skills Do You Need?

The technical skills required for designing augmented reality aren’t very different from the tools and skills used in 2D design. Typically designers can go down a few different routes:

Adding Two-Dimensional Elements to the Real World

Using flat images or 2D animation to enhance the world is one method of stepping into augmented reality. One example of this is a cultural collaboration project between Gemäldegalerie (an art museum in Berlin, Germany) and Project museum4punkt0 (an initiative to merge modern technology with cultural institutions). This project created an app that shows the process of the artists in an x-ray view when the viewer points their iPad at the artwork.

Adding Three-Dimensional Elements to the Real World

3D design and animation opens a lot of possibilities for the world of augmented reality. By using tools such as Maya, Cinema 4D, and Blender, designers can add their creations on top of the real world. IKEA did that with the IKEA’s Place app which allows shoppers to add virtual furniture to the rooms in their house so that they can see what it will look like in the space (Unknown).

Adding Audio to the Real World

Visual stimulus is not all that you can add. For both creative and accessibility reasons, try using audio cues as well. NEEEU, in partnership with the Natural History Museum in Berlin, created an exhibit where viewers could listen to the calls of the featured birds if they scanned certain markers with their smartphones (Unknown).

Don’t forget, you’re not limited to only one of the above routes (or only these routes at all). “It’s about bringing together different skill sets and seeing how we can build a product or app that’s going to benefit the environment” (Ivil).

Potential Design Impacts

So augmented reality will have a big impact on the design world but how specifically?

Apps will be more interactive. Shopping apps are a good example of this. You will be able to see “how a piece of furniture works in [your] home or how a dress fits on [your] frame” (Papaefstathiou). You will be able to find information about products and places as you walk past them so you can make a split-second decision of whether you want to know more.

Make mobile experiences more entertaining. In 2020, over 2 billion people have a smartphone and “61% of people are using their phones to go online” (Papaefstathiou). People always have their cell phones and it is important that designers use this to their benefit. As designers, we can use AR to help people engage with brands in ways that are informative and entertaining.

We no longer measure our design space in pixels. We have the ability to move from designing a screen to designing a physical space with AR. It makes it possible to add illustrative elements to places like the rooms in your house. Imagine that you are in your living room one minute and the next you are watching your favourite television show in the Amazon jungle.

Designing for new interactions will be a must. Augmented reality will push creatives to design for a world that gets progressively “more fluid and three-dimensional” (Papaefstathiou).This means we will need to understand new technologies and rethink old ones. We will need to think more about how people can interact with products, for example, using eye-tracking technology to let users select objects based on where they are looking (Papaefstathiou).

How to Jump In

While augmented reality in design is still relatively new, there are a few options for cutting your teeth on it. Adobe Aero is Adobe’s app for the iPad that allows users to test their AR designs in the real world. Zappar Studio is a program that allows users to design for AR as well. Learning programming languages like JavaScript may be helpful, but as programs become more designer friendly it becomes less necessary. Finally, a lot of AR designs are built out in the Unreal gaming engine. It is free and a good way to add different media.

Sources

  • Hayes, Adam. Augmented Reality Definition. 2 Dec. 2020, www.investopedia.com/terms/a/augmented-reality.asp.
  • Papaefstathiou, Maria. “AR’s Impending Impact on the Graphic Design Industry.” Graphic Art News, 23 May 2019, www.graphicart-news.com/ars-impending-impact-on-the-graphic-design-industry/.
  • Unknown. “Will Augmented Reality Last in Design Once the Hype Passes?” AIGA Eye on Design, 4 Feb. 2019, eyeondesign.aiga.org/the-designers-shaping-ars-present-and-future/.

Credits

Images by Visual Generation and Good Studio.